Michael S. Weisberg, P.C. Attorney at Law

Free Consultation
No Obligation
24 hour emergency service

800-401-4989
757-777-9214

Norfolk Personal Injury Law Blog

What do I look for in a nursing home for my aging parent?

Advances in medical science make it possible for many Americans to live longer than previous generations. Things like heart surgery and cancer treatments mean that many more of us will live well into our 70s. Unfortunately, as the general population grows older, some Virginia residents will require the constant supervision and care provided by long-term care centers or nursing homes. Choosing the right nursing home for your aging parent can prove to be one of the most important decisions you will ever make.

The National Center on Elder Abuse has identified several risk factors that may make your decision in selecting a good nursing home somewhat easier. According to the NCEA, most nursing homes observe accepted medical practices and preventative measures. However, there are still some facilities that do not. Research shows that poorly-managed institutions that care for the elderly can expose patients to injuries from falls, physical abuse by staff members and in some of the worst cases of neglect, even wrongful death.

Man launches lawsuit over injuries in snowplow truck accident

The dark early morning hours can be dangerous for pedestrians, because it's not yet light out and drivers must rely on their lights to see. Despite the dangers of the roads during these times, you still have a right to be there as long as you're following the law. Vehicles shouldn't be traveling so fast they can't see you, since this could cause accidents to happen.

If you remember hearing about a snowplowing incident involving two men who were struck in 2013, then you may have wondered what ever happened to the case. A report from April 16 stated that one of the two men involved in the accident has now decided to sue the snowplow driver and his employer for $1 million to cover his bills and pain and suffering.

Differences between felonies, misdemeanors and infractions

People who are facing the criminal justice system for the first time might have some questions about the type of charges they are facing. Many people already realize that a felony charge is more serious than a misdemeanor; however, the main difference between the two, the possible incarceration term, is stark.

A crime classified as a felony is punishable by a prison term of at least one year. A misdemeanor is usually punishable by up to a year in a county jail, not prison. That, however, isn't to say that everyone convicted of a crime will face time behind bars. There are a variety of punishments available for people who are convicted of crimes. Some people might choose to accept a plea arrangement or use an offer for a plea arrangement as a starting point for negotiations.

Motorcycle accident statistics and your personal injury lawsuit

As the weather continues to improve, an increasing number of motorcycle enthusiasts will begin to take their bikes and head out on the roads. Motorcycle riding offers several advantages. Motorcyclists often pay significantly less than drivers of other vehicles for fuel, vehicle maintenance and insurance. In addition, they love the exhilarating feeling of freedom that comes from feeling more in touch with the outdoors as you travel.

Virginia is a great state for motorcycling. As previously mentioned in one of our weblog entries, our state has been bucking the national upward trend for motorcycle fatalities in recent years. Statistics taken from between 2009 and 2013 indicate that the numbers of fatal motorcycle accidents have actually continued a downward trend during that period. Nevertheless, despite those encouraging numbers, there were still 63 fatal motorcycle accidents in Virginia in 2013.

What is underage drunk driving in Virginia?

We have discussed a variety of issues pertaining to drunk driving. In many cases, we discussed how drunk driving affected people who are 21 years old or older. Some people might not realize that Virginia has different laws regarding drunk driving that involves people who haven't yet reached the legal drinking age. The penalties for underage drinking and driving are harsh.

What is the legal limit for people who younger than 21 years old?

1 dead, 1 injured after multiple-car pile-up in Virginia

When you're on a highway, you know to be vigilant in monitoring your surroundings. Failing to check the other lanes before moving over can result in an accident, just like speeding or passing too close to another vehicle can. When semi-trucks are involved in an accident, the injuries may be worse than usual, with fatalities caused by the weight and impact of the larger vehicle.

If you've been in a crash like this one, then you'll be able to understand what these people and their families are going through right now. A fatal crash that recently took place near Exit 211 on I-64 has left one person dead and one injured.

Breathalyzer results don’t always guarantee DUI convictions

For the vast majority of us, a conviction for driving under the influence can prove disastrous for both our professional and personal lives. Chances are that you rely on the use of your vehicle to at least get you to and from work or school. Having your driving privileges suspended or revoked can literally mean the difference between some DUI offenders being unable to maintain their employment or continue their educations, especially for those living in rural areas with limited public transportation.

Drinking and driving is a serious threat to public safety. That being said, it is also important that law enforcement officials correctly identify those who are breaking the law. One of the primary law enforcement tools against drunk driving is the use of Breathalyzers. These specially calibrated electronic devices are useful in determining the blood alcohol concentration levels of suspected DUI offenders.

Various components can affect Virginia criminal defense strategy

Facing criminal charges is something that most people hope to avoid. In some cases, however, that isn't possible. There are some people who will end up facing criminal charges in Virginia despite their best efforts to avoid having to do so. When that occurs, offering a strong defense is necessary. There are a variety of components that come together to help build a strong defense.

One component is time. The earlier in your case that you contact us to get started on your defense, the more time we have to work with you to prepare. We know that you want to put the matter behind you and move on with your life.

Veteran suffered amputation due to alleged medical malpractice

How would you feel if you had to go through an operation in Virginia and later discovered you weren't healing properly, even though you were told you were? You'd likely be as upset as the man in this case who suffered after getting medical attention through the Veterans Affairs hospitals. He went through dozens of medical visits and surgeries, yet his doctors never were able to repair a shattered bone and failed to help him when the grafts and surgical equipment failed.

The man had shattered a shinbone when he fell from the roof of his home in 2011. At that point, he went to the local Veterans Affairs hospital for treatment, but it didn't go as planned. The Coast Guard veteran suffered severely due to the care he received, and the 45-year-old claims it ruined his life.

Is consent a defense in my Virginia statutory rape charge?

The concept of statutory rape is based on the premise that a minor cannot legally give his or her consent to have intercourse with someone. Currently in Virginia, people under the age of 18 are considered minors. Basically, Virginia courts will consider the age of both parties and punish the offender largely based on his or her age.

For example, if you are 18 years old and the person you had intercourse with is 13 years old, then you could be facing up to 10 years in prison and a $100,000 fine. Whereas, if you are 18 or older and have intercourse with someone who is three years your junior at 15 years old, then you may be looking at a year in jail and a fine of $2,500.

Ask Michael A Question

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Free Book Offer:

What You Need To Know About Getting a Fair and Reasonable Settlement

Settle

Follow Us Online:

  • Facebook Logo
  • Twitter Logo
  • Google Plus Logo

Privacy Policy | Business Development Solutions by FindLaw, a Thomson Reuters business.